Gingivitis in Cats: Symptoms, Home Remedies to Treat Feline Gingivitis

October 7, 2010 | Cat Health | Leave a Comment |

Symptoms of Gingivitis in Cats

  • Swelling and redness of the gums can be a sign of gingivitis in cats
  • Decrease in appetite and difficulty chewing are early signs of gingivitis.
  • Halitosis or bad breath can be a signal that your cat is having oral issues.
  • Also read how to treat canine anal sac infection

Causes of Cat’s Gingivitis

  • Aging, Specially at old age
  • Poor Oral Hygiene
  • Eating Soft food
  • Breathing with Open-mouth
  • Poor Chewing Habits
  • Diabetes

Treatments and Home Remedies for Gingivitis in Cats

  • You can help your cat have a healthy mouth and strong teeth by administering some simple treatments and home remedies.
  • Good mouth care and teeth brushing are just as important to your cats oral health as it is to yours. Both are very important in preventing gingivitis and tooth decay in cats.
  • Fresh water should always be available and in reach of your pet daily.
  • Use chlorhexidine toothpastes and rinses and a soft brush daily on your cats teeth to remove plaque.
  • Cats need chewy food, not mushy food or hard bone pieces. Bones can not only cause problems with choking if they are small, but large bones can cause teeth to break and chip.
  • Diet is very important to cat’s mouth and health of his teeth.
    Special diets are available that are listed as T/D on the labels, signifying that they are good for tooth health.
  • Neglecting your pets teeth and without proper cleaning can lead to peridontitis, an inflammation around the root of the tooth and eventually tooth loss.
  • Proper oral care and regular dental visits can save your feline friend unnecessary pain and discomfort.
  • Ultrasonic¬† scaling may be done at the dentist to remove plaque buildup above and below the gum line to prevent disease. This treatment can stop gingivitis in its tracks and can also reverse it if already in progress.
  • Chronic gingivitis, despite good oral care for your cat, should be followed up with¬† FeVL testing.

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