Atypical Addison’s disease in Dogs: How to Treat, Symptoms & Treatment

January 20, 2011 | Healthy Dog | Leave a Comment |

Addison’s disease In Dogs

Addison’s disease is also known as hypoadrenocorticism. It is the opposite of Cushing’s disease and it can affect dogs of all ages and of any breed.

  • The condition is characterized by a decrease in the production of hormones by the adrenal gland.
  • In dogs, the most common cause of the condition is a destruction of the adrenal glands, usually by the immune system.
  • Infections, cancer, and medication can also damage the glands. Also read low thyroid in dogs
  • It can also result from the misuse or the abrupt cessation of the use of steroids.
  • This is a rare condition in cats and dogs
  • There is some evidence that the disease is caused by genetically inherited traits
  • Atypical Addison’s Disease in Dogs can also occur

The disease process usually leaves the body deficient of two hormones, they are mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids.

  • Mineralocorticoids, mostly aldosterone, are responsible for the electrolyte balance in the body.
  • Glucocorticoid, mostly cortisol, is responsible for blood sugar level maintenance and helps combat stress.

Symptoms to Watch Out For

  • Anorexia
  • Vomiting
  • Nausea
  • Weight Loss
  • Dehydration
  • Depression
  • Polydipsia, increased thirst
  • Diarrhea
  • Lethargy, Syncope
  • Low heart rate
  • Low body temperature
  • Shaking

Diagnostic Tests

Here are the diagnostic tests used to determine the presence of Addison’s Disease in dogs.

  • ACTH Stimulation Test ??” Checks the level of adrenal hormones in the body
  • Imaging studies
  • Blood Work
  • Physical Examination
  • Medical History

Treatment

  • Fluid Therapy ??” Given to dehydrated dogs
  • Electrolyte and acid-base balance monitoring ??” the condition can cause imbalances that need to be corrected.
  • Hormone replacement therapy, for glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids.
  • Salt supplementation, may be prescribed to patients that have a chronic form of the disease.

Home care is going to involve administering the medication. Owners should also make sure that the dog is well hydrated and any occurrence of the symptoms of Addison’s should be reported to the vet immediately.

Related Reading:

Canine Addison’s Disease

Dogs can also be affected by ailments that affect humans.

Among these ailments is Addison’s disease.

Canine Addison’s Disease

  • Addison’s disease is an ailment caused by a deficiency of the hormones from the adrenal glands.
  • This ailment can affect humans and animals alike.
  • Some dog breeds are more prone to developing this ailment compared to others. These breeds are:

o    Great Danes

o    Portuguese Water Dogs

o    West Highland White Terriers

o    Bearded Collies

o    Standard Poodles

o    Basset Hounds

o    Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers

o    Airedale Terriers

o    Springer Spaniels

  • This ailment could be due to:

o    Damage or trauma on the adrenal glands

o    Side effect of other ailments, including cancer

o    Damage on the body’s own tissues and organs due to auto-immune disorders

 

Canine Addison’s Disease Symptoms

 

  • Possible symptoms of Addison’s disease include:

o    Dehydration

o    Vomiting

o    Diarrhea

o    Appetite loss

o    Rapid weight loss

o    General poor health

o    lethargy

  • Owners should watch out for these symptoms and bring the dog to a vet. These symptoms are similar to the symptoms of other diseases so that misdiagnosis could happen, especially if no diagnostic or confirmatory tests are done.

Canine Addison’s Disease Treatment

  • Possible treatments for Addison’s disease in dogs could include:

o    Oral medications

o    Oral hormone replacement therapy

o    Some steroids may also be helpful

o    Often, dogs are given IV fluids to help address dehydration as well as to provide the body with its needed electrolytes.

o    Home remedies such as dandelion, garlic, and licorice are also good options.

Canine Addison’s Disease Diet

  • Dogs with Addison’s disease are given a special diet. These could be:

o    Commercial food with no ethoxyquin. These food options should also have human-grade whole ingredients.

o    Dogs might also be given biologically appropriate raw foods.

o    Home cooked food items, especially those with vegetables, are also good options.

Related Reading:

Canine Addison’s Disease

Dogs can also be affected by ailments that affect humans. Among these ailments is Addison’s disease. Addison’s disease is an ailment caused by a deficiency of the hormones from the adrenal glands.

  • This ailment can affect humans and animals alike.
  • Some dog breeds are more prone to developing this ailment compared to others. These breeds are:

o    Great Danes

o    Portuguese Water Dogs

o    West Highland White Terriers

o    Bearded Collies

o    Standard Poodles

o    Basset Hounds

o    Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers

o    Airedale Terriers

o    Springer Spaniels

  • This ailment could be due to:

o    Damage or trauma on the adrenal glands

o    Side effect of other ailments, including cancer

o    Damage on the body’s own tissues and organs due to auto-immune disorders

Canine Addison’s Disease Symptoms

 

  • Possible symptoms of Addison’s disease include:

o    Dehydration

o    Vomiting

o    Diarrhea

o    Appetite loss

o    Rapid weight loss

o    General poor health

o    lethargy

  • These symptoms are similar to the symptoms of other diseases so that misdiagnosis could happen, especially if no diagnostic or confirmatory tests are done.

Canine Addison’s Disease Treatment

 

  • Possible treatments for Addison’s disease in dogs could include:

o    Oral medications

o    Oral hormone replacement therapy

o    Some steroids may also be helpful

o    Often, dogs are given IV fluids to help address dehydration as well as to provide the body with its needed electrolytes.

o    Home remedies such as dandelion, garlic, and licorice are also good options.

Canine Addison’s Disease Diet

 

  • Dogs with Addison’s disease are given a special diet. These could be:

o    Commercial food with no ethoxyquin. These food options should also have human-grade whole ingredients.

o    Dogs might also be given biologically appropriate raw foods.

o    Home cooked food items, especially those with vegetables, are also good options.

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