Canine Tooth Extraction: Surgery Cost, Recovery & Complications

January 28, 2011 | Healthy Dog | Leave a Comment |

Extracting a dog’s tooth needs to be done with care and the handler needs to have exceptional skills. Remember, it is important to know the indications for tooth extraction before deciding to go for it.

Canine Tooth Extraction

  • This refers to the extraction of a canine or dog’s tooth.
  • There are some cases wherein dog tooth does not have to be extracted; there are also indications for it to be extracted.
  • A vet or a trained extractor will be able to handle this job.
  • Never attempt to extract the dog’s tooth without the aid of a vet or expert.

Canine Tooth Extraction Cost

  • Preventing dental diseases will cost a lot less than having canine teeth extracted.
  • Cost of the procedure will vary depending on factors such as who performs the procedure, the extent of the disease or dental condition, the use of any anesthetics, and where the procedure is performed.

Canine Tooth Extraction Recovery

  • With rest and proper diet, recovery from tooth extraction is quite fast.
  • The recovery will depend on the dog and its overall condition.
  • Recovery will also depend on the extent of the extraction.
  • Post-operatively, dogs will be given a steady dose of analgesia to help relieve pain and discomfort as well as reduce any post-operative swelling.

Canine Tooth Extraction Complications

The dog’s oral cavity is highly vascularized. Any operation done inside the oral cavity needs to be handled with care in order to prevent any complications.

  • Hemorrhage – bleeding can occur during the procedure or several hours after the operation. An IV line has to be present in order to deliver emergency medications and transfusions when necessary.
  • Fistula – the formation of a fistula will not be apparent until after several weeks after surgery. A fistula is an opening or communication between two cavities.
  • Root fracture – this complication is often caused by poor technique.
  • Symphysis separation – especially when extracting mandibular canine teeth.
  • Damage to structures deep beneath the alveolar socket.

Speak Your Mind